Walking Rain Review presents the creative
talents of those who are currently
incarcerated in Arizona state prisons and
those who have been incarcerated in Arizona
state prisons in the past.

Creative writing in the
Walking Rain Review
ranges from work of fledgling writers to the
work of several who have been widely
published and won national prizes and
recognition.  Most of the contributors have
been members of one or another of the
various Creative Writing Workshops in
Arizona's state prison system, directed by
Richard Shelton.  

The Writing Workshops and each issue of
Walking Rain Review are funded by grants
from the Lannan Foundation, in Santa Fe,
New Mexico.
Walking Rain Review | P.O. Box 85462 | Tucson, AZ 85754-5462
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About Walking Rain Review
Meet the Editors
RICHARD SHELTON
EDITOR

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:
Going Back to Bisbee (1992)

The Last Person to Hear Your
Voice (2007)

Crossing the Yard: Thirty Years
as a Prison Volunteer (2007)

www.richardwshelton.com
KEN LAMBERTON
MANAGING EDITOR

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS:
Wilderness and Razor Wire: a
Naturalist's Observations from
Prison (2000)

Beyond Desert Walls: Essays
from Prison (2005)

Time of Grace: Thoughts on
Nature, Family and the Politics of
Crime and Punishment (2007)

www.kenlamberton.com
Essay From the Editor
HARD-ASS AND THE INNOCENTS
BY RICHARD SHELTON

PUBLISHED PREVIOUSLY
In Rattle, Issue 10, Winter 1998, and reprinted in Walking Rain Review VI, 2000 with
permission from Ms Stellasue Lee, editor of
Rattle magazine.

An Excerpt:

"Prison is the human garbage dump of our culture.  How could one survive at all after
having been convinced as a child that he or she was destined to go there?  In the light of
such lives, the current jargon "poor self image" is meaningless.  When I am tempted to be
kind about their writing rather than critical, I think about this and tell myself that they must
be tough or they would not have survived to this point.  Some of them can't take it, and
don't return to the workshop, but an amazing majority of them come back for more.  They
learn to be critical of their own work and to be critical of the work of others.  They learn to
be proud.  The
y demand that their work be judged by the same standards as the work of
those writers in the free world.  Nothing makes me so proud as to see their pride, knowing
what it has cost them to achieve it."

Read the Essay in Walking Rain Review VI.